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A UNIX Bigot Learns About .NET and Azure Performance – Part 1

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This blog post is the beginning of my journey to learn more about .NET and Microsoft Azure as it applies to performance monitoring. I’ve long admitted to being a UNIX bigot but recently I see a lot of good things going on with Microsoft. As a performance monitoring geek I feel compelled to understand more about these technologies at a deep enough level to provide good guidance when asked by peers and acquaintances.

The Importance of .NET

Here are some of the reasons why .NET is so important:

  • In a 2013 Computer World article, C# was listed as the #6 most important programming language to learn along with ASP.NET ranking at #14.
  • In a 2010 Forrester article .NET was cited as the top development platform used by respondents.
  • .NET is also a very widely used platform in financial services. An article published by WhiteHat Security stated that “.NET, Java and ASP are the most widely used programming languages at 28.1%, 25% and 16% respectively.” In reference to financial service companies.
  • The Rise of Azure

    .NET alone is pretty interesting from a statistical perspective but the rise of Azure in the cloud computing PaaS and IaaS world is a compounding factor. In a “State of the Cloud” survey conducted by RightScale, Azure was found to be the 3rd most popular public cloud computing platform for Enterprises. In a report published by Capgemini, 73% of their respondents globally stated that Azure was part of their cloud computing strategy with strong support across retail, financial services, energy/utilities, public, and telecommunications/media verticals.

    Developer influence

    Not to be underestimated in this .NET/Azure world is the influence that developers will have on overall adoption levels of each technology platform. Microsoft has created an integration between Visual Studio (the IDE used to develop on the .NET platform) and Azure that makes it extremely easy to deploy .NET applications onto the Azure cloud. Ease of deployment is one of the key factors in the success of new enterprise technologies and Microsoft has definitely created a great opportunity for itself by ensuring that .NET apps can be easily deployed to Azure through the interface developers are already familiar with.

    The fun part is yet to come

    Before I started my research for this blog series I didn’t realize how far Microsoft had come with their .NET and Azure technologies. To me, if you work in IT operations you absolutely must understand these important technologies and embrace the fact that Microsoft has really entrenched itself in the enterprise. I’m looking forward to learning more about the performance considerations of .NET and Azure and sharing that information with you in my follow-up posts. Keep an eye out for my next post as I dive into the relevant IIS and WMI/Perfmon performance counters and details.

    The post A UNIX Bigot Learns About .NET and Azure Performance – Part 1 written by appeared first on Application Performance Monitoring Blog from AppDynamics.

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